Connect with us

fight news

It's Quiet Uptown: The fight over Gaiter Lake – Southernminn.com

Published

on

fight news

One Brutal Scene of Edward Norton's Hulk That Makes Him Way … – FandomWire

Published

on







You are here:


The Marvel Cinematic Universe keeps its movies PG-13 for a reason. Kids as well as adults enjoy these superhero movies but the MCU has broken the rule several times. Edward Norton portrayed the character of Hulk in 2008’s The Incredible Hulk quite more brutally than Mark Ruffalo.
Talking about the movie that wasn’t much of a success, fans were reminded of what the early MCU used to look like. In a brutal scene in the movie, people around the world were quit shocked when Edward Norton’s Hulk kicks Tim Roth’s Abomination into a tree with a little blood splattering on-screen!
Admittedly, the MCU hadn’t fully established itself as a cinematic universe when The Incredible Hulk was released back in 2008 the Hulk was still a part of the Marvel comics. Edward Norton, from the Fight Club fame, decided to join in for the ride by portraying the role of Bruce Banner in the movie.
Also read: “This ain’t gonna work”: Matt Damon Made a Life Changing Decision With Ben Affleck After Edward Norton Schooled Him in an Audition For an Oscar Worthy Role
Although the movie did not meet people’s expectations, the film had its fair share of iconic scenes and clips. One of the notable scenes was the Hulk fighting against Tim Roth’s Emil Blonsky. Being a fearless soldier tasked with killing Bruce Banner, Tim Roth had an exceptional fight scene with the Hulk.
After the fight is over, Blonsky walks up to Norton in his Hulk form and asks “Is that it? Is that all you got?”. This results in the Hulk getting angrier and kicking Blonsky so hard that he flies a few feet away. The scene depicts Blonsky hitting the ground and rolling towards a tree stump. With a hard thud, the character lands face-first into the tree stump and his body sinks to the ground.
Although the focus is on General Ross during that scene, the out-of-focus face of Blonsky shows quite a significant amount of bleeding. The scene is intense and terrifying at the same time which showcased the fact that Edward Norton’s Hulk was indeed more devastating and chaotic compared to Mark Ruffalo’s Hulk in the MCU.
Suggested: ‘The Godfather’ Director Chose Matt Damon Over Marvel Star Edward Norton Because of Damon’s $100 Million War Movie With Denzel Washington
Related: “I didn’t feel that it was honored”: Breaking Bad Star Bryan Cranston Revealed He Would Never Work With Director Who Clashed With Edward Norton During Their $20M Movie
It could have been a very likely possibility that the scene mentioned above was written by Edward Norton himself. According to film trivia, Tim Roth (who got kicked in the face) stated that Norton used to re-write his scenes every day while on the sets of The Incredible Hulk.
The Fight Club actor and Liv Tyler also used to sit down every day and talk for hours before filming would start. As per the trivia, the duo would discuss their character’s lives especially before Bruce Banner became the Hulk which helped with the bonding between them. The Incredible Hulk received a rating of 6.6/10 on IMDB and 67% on Rotten Tomatoes and wasn’t much of a success. The 2008 film is available to stream on Disney+.
Source: ScreenRant, IMDB

Visarg Acharya joined FandomWire in 2022 as a Content Writer. Along with a penchant for writing, Visarg claims that words are the only true language made for him. Currently pursuing his B.Sc in Physics, the combination of Physics and Marvel make up for an interesting talk. Visarg Acharya has authored over 500 articles and reads books in his spare time along with an occasional series to accompany him.
Want more stuff like this?
Get the best viral stories straight into your inbox!


Don't worry, we don't spam
© FandomWire, LLC. All rights reserved.

source



Continue Reading

fight news

Computers have moved on, but sons can still put dads in their place… – The Guardian

Published

on





My son has started coding. He’s only five and I reckon we may have to expand the definition of coding a little, but he has joined something called Coding Club at his school. It involves him and his classmates sitting at computers and, well, I’m not sure what happens after that, since he observes a Fight Club-style omertà when it comes to anything he does at school.
He is familiar with computers and often joins me in my office – his baby sister’s bedroom – while I work on these very articles. It would be charming if I could say he’s helped much in their writing, perhaps offered a paragraph or two you’ve enjoyed – but this has not been the case. He mostly enjoys opening a new document and using the keyboard to write the longest, rudest words he can spell (‘poo-trampoline’ being a favourite) and I am left to do the grunt work myself.
I read that Coding Club uses a game-based platform that enables students to ‘code sprites to move around in different environments’ in which they make ‘rockets, trucks, spiders and even Cinderella!’ It sounds impressive, so I look online to find the module and try it myself. I am presented with a cheery little penguin suspended in the void. As I move said bird, a readout displays his grid coordinates. There are dozens of toolbars and dropdown tabs which, I presume, allow you to do magnificent things with this penguin, but after about four minutes I realise I have no idea what I’m doing and return to my oppressive deadlines.
My own instruction in computing was mostly at home. I was lucky in that my dad was an early adopter, who first caught the tech bug in the 90s. As a civil engineer, his job had little to do with computers, but his fondness for anything square, beige and bleeping meant he was drafted as an ad-hoc IT department for his office and our garage soon became an angular graveyard of discarded CPUs, printers, scanners and servers, with which he would mess, fiddle and, occasionally, perform resurrections. It was here that my little brother and I spent a large part of our childhood, setting up battered servers and mounting local area networks to play Doom on salvaged PCs. We repaid our dad by telling him, ‘You’re doing it wrong’ the second our skills overpassed his own.
The instruction I received in school was paltry in comparison. I did my GCSE in ICT in 2002, a year before the curriculum was updated, working from decade-old textbooks that referred exclusively to ‘electronic mail’ and mentioned the internet only briefly by saying ‘as many as 4 million people may soon be on the world wide web’. An accurate number for 2002 would have been 560m, it’s now almost 6bn, my son among them.
I won’t have him falling behind. When he comes in from school, I show him I have the module right here at home and wiggle the little penguin around for his edification. ‘Daddy,’ he says, ‘you’re doing it wrong,’ and something inside me dies.
Did Ye Hear Mammy Died? by Séamas O’Reilly is out now (Little, Brown, £16.99). Buy a copy from guardianbookshop at £14.78
Follow Séamas on Twitter @shockproofbeats

source



Continue Reading

fight news

Man gunned down during an apparent street fight in Arlington – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Published

on





Arlington Police are investigating the murder of a man gunned down during a fight Friday night.
The department said officers were called to a shooting just before midnight Saturday along the 1800 block of E. Mitchell Street. The officers reported arriving to find a 33-year-old man on the ground with multiple apparent gunshot wounds.
The man was taken to a nearby hospital where he died sometime Saturday. The man’s identity will be released by the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office after his family has been notified.
Police said investigators believe the man got into a physical fight with a group of people and during that fight, someone pulled out a gun and shot him multiple times.
Investigators do not believe the shooting is random and believe the victim knew at least one of the people in the group.
Arlington Police have not publicly identified any suspects or announced any arrests.
The investigation into the shooting is ongoing. Detectives are asking residents in the area to check their home surveillance cameras for any possible video evidence.
The latest news from around North Texas.
Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call Detective Hall at 817-459-5325. Tipsters can also remain anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers of Tarrant County at 817-469-8477 (TIPS).

source



Continue Reading

Trending